Prince Tui Teka


It’s an endearing moment in New Zealand television – in front of a live audience, Prince Tui Teka serenades his mother and mother-in-law, both clearly uncomfortable, with ‘Mum’, a saccharine ballad with inane lyrics.

Corny. Soppy. In almost anyone else’s hands, this would be open to ridicule, but there is something appealing about a 140kg rough-hewn Māori with crooked teeth displaying his sentimental side so openly.

The Maori Volcanics in Scotland - with Margery Mahora Peters, Nuki Waaka, John Nelson and Prince Tui Teka
Maori Battalion Trilogy
Prince Tui Teka in the mid 1970s
Prince Tui Teka, early 1970s
Photo credit: Photo by Malcolm Curson
The Maori Volcanics. From left to right: Nuki Waaka, Tui Teka, Mahora Peters, Hector Epae and Johnny Nelson, with John "Gimmick" Cameron at back.
Photo credit: Thanks to Rim D. Paul
The Maori Volcanics play Timaru
Photo credit: Johnny Tucker collection
The original 1970s score for the bass part in When The Next Teardrop Falls
Photo credit: Stephen O'Hoy collection
Prince Tui Teka with The Maori Volcanics. Front row from left: Nuki Waaka, Gilbert Smith, Mahora Peters, Tui Teka (at rear), Hector Epae, John Nelson.
Tui Teka's chart for bass in The Stripper
Photo credit: Stephen O'Hoy collection
Tui Teka's debut album for Ode, released in 1974
Maori Troubadours - Shakin' In The Shaky Isle (1960)
The famed Māori linguist and teacher Ngoi Pēwhairangi. Ngoi wrote the lyrics to two No.1 singles, The Patea Māori Club's Poi E and and Prince Tui Teka's E Ipo. She died in 1985.
It's unknown if these handwritten lyrics are penned by Tui Teka but they come from the music used by his band in the 1970s
Photo credit: Stephen O'Hoy collection
Tui Teka and wife Missy sing Tui’s hit 'E Ipo' after presenting Ngoi Pewhairangi with the gold disc for writing the te reo lyrics, 1982
Photo credit: TVNZ
The Maori Album (1976)
The third Ode album, from 1977
Publicity portrait of Prince Tui Teka by an unknown photographer, 1972
Photo credit: Alexander Turnbull Library, EP-NZ Obits-Ta to Te-01
Prince Tui Teka with The Maori Troubadours, Northern Australia, 1964
The Maori Volcanics, mid to late 1960s. From left: Gugi Waaka, Tui Teka, John (Gimmick) Cameron and Johnny Nelson, doing the 'Guitar boogie' where they played each other's guitar as well as their own
Photo credit: Thanks to Rim D. Paul
1983 Variety Show (clip 1)
The Maori Volcanics, with Tui Teka at rear. Front row, from left: Nuki Waaka, Gilbert Smith, Mahora Peters, Hector Epae, John Nelson.
The 1970s drum score for Pokare Kare/ Hoki Mai/ Amen
Photo credit: Stephen O'Hoy collection
A late 1950s Australian EP - Tui Teka is in the centre
Prince Tui Teka in a publicity shot taken in 1983
The tenor sax part for Hoki Mai - one wonders who wrote the note about "Poor Curry Curry Arna", perhaps an Australian player? It has been corrected.
Photo credit: Stephen O'Hoy collection
E Ipo
The Maori Volcanics doing their broken glass act, with Margery Mahora Peters, Nuki Waaka, John Nelson, Gilbert Smith and Prince Tui Teka
Trivia:

The bands on many of the 1970s Ode recordings were some of the best in the land and included Quincy Conserve and Rocking Horse

Labels:

Ode


RCA

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